The Foundry

"American History and Fairytale Structure in Illusions: A Collection of American Fairytales"

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dc.contributor.author Hill, Claire
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-26T17:28:54Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-26T17:28:54Z
dc.date.issued 2016-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11415/762
dc.description Faculty Advisor: Marcia L. Hurlow, Ph.D., M.F.A. en_US
dc.description.abstract Fairytales encompass compelling themes and bizarre elements, exist primarily as archetypes yet vary widely from culture to culture, and contain very little character development. Still fairytales clutch my imagination and refuse to let go, in part because of the possibility entrenched in the actions and motivations of characters that are never fully explained. Investigating the differences in tales by the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Anderson, Andrew Lang, Charles Perrault, and others intrigues me, and as this collection of stories grew, I availed myself many times of the Aarne–Thompson Tale Type Index, which, as Alan Dundes has said, is one of the “most valuable tools in the professional folklorist's arsenal of aids for analysis” (195). In Illusions, a collection of stories both long and short, I take fairytales and situate them in different regions and time periods of America to see what the new historical and cultural context adds to the story. Some tales contain fantastic elements, such as magic; some merely follow the fairytale’s plot. Depending on the story, I sometimes remain loyal to the familiar beats of the fairytale, and other times may only borrow themes and loosely attach the tale to my story. After explaining my writing process, I will detail some of the research involved with crafting and compiling this collection. en_US
dc.subject Fairy tales en_US
dc.title "American History and Fairytale Structure in Illusions: A Collection of American Fairytales" en_US


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